72 hours left on early-bird savings for TC Sessions: Mobility 2019

We’re totally stoked to see all of you at TC Sessions: Mobility 2019 on July 10 in San Jose, Calif. That’s slightly less than a month away, and if you want to save on the price of admission, you need to play beat the clock. Early-bird pricing ends on Friday, June 14 at 11:59 p.m. (PT).

That’s a hundred bucks, people. Why pay more? Buy your early-bird ticket now and save that Benjamin for a rainy day.

TC Sessions: Mobility 2019 is a day-long conference focusing on the current and future state of mobility and transportation. More than 1,000 members of these communities — founders, technologists, engineering students and investors — will gather to learn, share, demo and network.

TechCrunch editors will interview some of the best minds and makers in mobility and transportation — the people making it happen. They’ll look at the promises, expose the hype and address the complex challenges inherent in these revolutionary industries.

Autonomous vehicles are a hot topic, and you’ll hear a lot on that subject. We can’t wait to hear from Jesse Levinson, co-founder and CTO of Zoox. He oversees the company’s software, artificial intelligence, computing and sensing platforms. He’ll talk with us about the company’s deployment plans and the challenges ahead.

The jam-packed agenda includes some of the transportation industry’s biggest names. Folks like Seleta Reynolds of the Los Angeles Department of Transportation, Ford Motor CTO Ken Washington, Mobileye co-founder and CEO Amnon Shashua, Karl Iagnemma of Aptiv, Alisyn Malek with May Mobility and Dmitri Dolgov at Waymo.

What’s happening with mobility investment? We’ve got that covered, too. You’ll hear from Michael Granoff (Maniv Mobility), Ted Serbinski (Techstars) and Sarah Smith (Bain Capital).

Here’s another way to experience TC Sessions: Mobility 2019. Buy a demo table. You won’t find a better place to showcase your mobility startup to a more targeted, influential audience. We’re talking founders, investors, technologists and media. The price includes three attendee tickets for extra ROI.

TC Sessions: Mobility 2019 takes place July 10 in San Jose, Calif. It’s time to play beat the clock. Early-bird pricing ends in 72 hours on Friday, June 14 at 11:59 p.m. (PT). Buy your ticket today and save $100.

Is your company interested in sponsoring or exhibiting at TC Sessions: Mobility? Contact our sponsorship sales team by filling out this form.


By Emma Comeau

Travis Kalanick is already back running a company with a $150M investment

Travis Kalanick, the former Uber CEO who was shown the door in June last year amid a series of major controversies, has already found his next leading role following his announcement of a new investment fund just weeks ago.

Kalanick said on Twitter that his fund would be investing $150 million to take a controlling interest in City Storage Systems, or CSS. He will also be running the company as CEO, according to Recode. It’s a holding company focused on redevelopment of distressed real estate. Kalanick resigned from Uber after facing a lawsuit with Waymo over trade secrets, an ongoing battle with existing shareholders Benchmark Capital, and the fallout from a harassment probe led by former attorney general Eric Holder. Uber brought on new CEO Dara Kosrowshahi in August last year.

Travis announced that he would be starting a new fund with his windfall from Uber shares sold in its most recent major secondary round. At the time, Kalanick said the new fund — called 10100, or “ten one hundred” — would be geared toward “large-scale job creation,” with investments in real estate, ecommerce, and “emerging innovation in India and China.” CSS has two businesses, CloudKitchens and CloudRetail, which focus on redevelopment of distressed assets in those two areas.

The former is pretty interesting given that Uber has its own food delivery service, UberEats. Should Kalanick’s new venture find ways to acquire distressed food-related real estate — kitchens around a city, for example — there may be a natural overlap with his experience at Uber as it started to explore food. Having massive operating kitchens located in one area with a delivery fleet associated with it is one thing, but having an array of smaller kitchens redeveloped through a company like CSS could provide a kind of distributed network that might make it easier to get food from one kitchen to its delivery in a shorter period of time.

It’s not that we know CSS is focusing on that explicitly, but Amazon also bought a bunch of buildings for $13.7 billion, and now it has a two-hour delivery service in major metropolitan areas. Of course, Travis was shown the door at Uber, so it remains to be seen how this one is going to play out. The Information notes that CSS was owned by a friend of Kalanick’s as well as having a loose connection with Uber.